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It dropped so low — in my Regard —
I heard it hit the Ground —
And go to pieces on the Stones
At bottom of my Mind —

Yet blamed the Fate that flung it — less
Than I denounced Myself,
For entertaining Plated Wares
Upon my Silver Shelf —

This is yet another interesting poem by Emily Dickenson. I’m finding a lot of her work to really be challenging and interesting. In this poem I believe Emily is talking about herself or a feeling some has about them self of disappointment. The first stanza seems to just spell it out that person feel they did wrong in their own eyes ( “I dropped so low in my Regard” ) and the last line of the first stanza “ At the bottom of my mind”. This poem almost doesn’t need an explanation I think, its practically self explanatory, the only hard part is maybe the last two lines of the poem because she is talking about something with terms we don’t use anymore or its just something I don’t know of. She uses the word platted which makes me think of the word fake right away, I don’t know if that what she meant but I makes sense to me. She says she was entertaining fake wares upon her silver shelf, which makes me think that the sliver shelf is something for real wares but these were only fake and sliver so she is saying she feels bad because maybe someone wronged her by being fake to her and she deserves better.
- BST BST Feb 26, 2008



Tough Words
Wares-merchandise

Compare/Contrast
The dropping of a thought

Bro when you read these and wonder why i do the tough word thing it is because it helps me understand the poem a little bit better.

I feel dissapointment when iread this poem, and i cnnot imagine what dickinson felt as she was writing it. i mean she must have felt some majoor sorrow, and i feel for her. i also think that his is what the poem is about, dissappointmnet. I really do not see a subject it the poem all i see are words writing that lead to the same conclusion. i also think there is a possibility of the person/dickinson is dissapointed in something they did, "in my regard," there you go clear cut. I am really finding this poem hard to write about, which to me seems like a chracteristic all good poets should have. I think this because if they were good they had already said it as good as it can get and there really is no better way of putting it, so by me not being able to put to words the feeling and thoughts of the poem are to me at least a good thing.

- GKE GKE Feb 26, 2008


I find this poem very hard to understand in terms of what Emily Dickinson might be trying to tell her readers. Overall, this poem just seems to be about an accidental mistake that happens to be about dropping some silverware. I personally think this might mean more than it comes off to be. Maybe she's talking about a real life event or relationship that seemed so perfect and yet fragile, as silverware. And, suddenly and addicental fault might've caused it to break and nothing could put the pieces back together. Emily Dickinson might be trying to point out the signifigance of something so important, that any minor mistake might end in a tragic result. - aow1 aow1 Feb 27, 2008

This poem was hard for me to understand. I had to read this poem by Emily Dickinson a few times before I started to get it a little. I was kind of confused about the first stanza because she says...

It dropped so low — in my Regard —
I heard it hit the Ground —
And go to pieces on the Stones
At bottom of my Mind —

Since she says that it "go to pieces" it makes it seems like what ever she is talking about is breakable. But the rest of the stanza makes it seem like "it" -the thing she is talking about isnt something that she actually dropped. And I also think this because it says "at bottom of my mind". Therefore I think that Emily Dickinson could be talking about a feeling or a thought. Or a mistake, and accident.
I think this poem was probably an emotional one for Emily Dickinson to write. This seems like she could be talking about an expierence that she has had.
I liked this poem, even though I didn't get it at first.
- hla hla Feb 27, 2008

Ok, about the first stanza.
It dropped so low — in my Regard —
I heard it hit the Ground —
And go to pieces on the Stones
At bottom of my Mind —


I think that the "it" in the stanza isn't a concrete object. I believe it to be how she views herself; her referring to herself. I think that she is talking about something that she did that makes her feel so low, and so disappointed in herself that she describes it as hitting rock bottom and hearing it break into pieces. The it could be referring to her soul, her conscious, or her heart. Instead of blaming fate, she blames the fact that the relationships she has had were not of a lasting time period. I think that this poem was something that we all go through. There will always be that one thing in life that we can look back on and think would of, should of, could of, and that because we didn't take a chance, it has stayed with us forever.- ape2 ape2 Feb 28, 2008ape2

This poem did not make much sense at first, but after a second read through, it made more sense to me. I think that Dickinson is describing how she felt after something horrible, maybe the death of a loved one, occurred. In the first line, the thing that dropped was probably her soul or her confidence when the horrible event occurred. Dickinson is basically describing how distraught she felt when the event happened. From the first stanza, you can tell that Dickinson was completly distraught over whatever happened. However, in the second stanza, Dickinson is accepting whatever happened and saying that she knew that it had to happen. Overall, I liked this poem. It shows Dickinson's willingness to express her feelings about things that happened during her life. Tihs poem was easy to understand as well, and I sort of enjoyed it.- PSa PSa Feb 28, 2008


I find this poem hard to understand in terms of what Dickinson might be trying to tell us, her readers. This poem just seems to be about an accidental mistake that happens to be about dropping some silverware. I personally think this might mean more than it comes off to be like most of her poems. Maybe she's talking about an event or relationship that seemed so perfect and yet fragile, she may have had something in her life that she thought was strong but fell apart. I think also no matter how hard she tried she couldn't put it together. Emily Dickinson might also be trying to point out the signifigance of something so important, that any minor mistake might end in a tragic result.

- dte dte Mar 5, 2008